anitalorrainemoore

Musician devoted to Justice, Creativity, and Courage


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Pat McCrory steals from North Carolinians

In North Carolina, we were just denied $10,000,000,000 by our governor, Pat McCrory.

March 5, 2013
“Today behind closed doors, a smiling governor signed a bill that blocks Medicaid expansion in North Carolina… McCrory denied health insurance to half a million North Carolinians – health insurance that would have been paid for 100% by the federal government for three years and 90% by the federal government thereafter.”Image

This is absolutely ridiculous.  We didn’t get to vote on whether or not we needed that money for health care!  While alienating his constituencies, McCrory has created a hostility between the poor and his cabinet – raising their salaries (because he felt they weren’t paid enough vs. the private sector!)

The bridge between the rich and the poor is wider than it has ever been.  See this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=QPKKQnijnsM

We need to recall this governor.  I think we need to change NC.  Private money and corporate billions created a rift in this state this election year (and before) that enabled people like McCrory, not interested in helping to mend this rift but to only widen it, to ruin our state; to make life that much more difficult for the working people who are the backbone of society.  Stealing from us with budget cuts all the while spending billions of subsidies to corporations, while wealthy individuals and those corporations are making millions from tax loopholes!

We need working people protections.  We need opportunity for the poor and shrinking middle class. We need leaders who KNOW what it is to be POOR AND HAVE NO VOICE IN THE POLITICAL GAME.  People who understand that voting isn’t the ONLY way a person can have their voice heard in the government. The only way we can do this is to call for public financing of elections in NC.  What does that mean? See below for details: Image

This is an old version of this information.  NOW the info about how much $ was spent and favors that are provided ARE EVEN WORSE and DRASTICALLY MORE. Let’s get $ out of politics and recall McCrory.

Here’s a video of a song by Lupe Fiasco, some fine, political hip-hop: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=9QGzsRpKTv4


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Like I don’t already have enough to do…

Online classes you can take for free from really amazing universities…

This is the one that piqued my interest the most: The Challenges of Global Poverty https://www.edx.org/courses/MITx/14.73x/2013_Spring/about

ABOUT THIS COURSE

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Are the poor always hungry? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is microfinance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be “nasty, brutish and short”? Should we leave economic development to the market? Should we leave economic development to non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Does foreign aid help or hinder? Where is the best place to intervene? And many others. At the end of this course, you should have a good sense of the key questions asked by scholars interested in poverty today, and hopefully a few answers as well.

PREREQUISITES

This course is intended to be an introduction to the issues of global poverty, as conceptualized by leading economists and political scientists. Previous exposure to economics would be beneficial, then, as concepts such as income vs. substitution effects, Engel curves, and utility functions will be discussed. Similarly, some experience with statistics will also be helpful: we will be examining, for example, empirical evidence in the form of regression results.

That said, these prerequisites are not critical to understanding and learning from the course. Links will be provided, as much as possible, on background issues and further reading to allow all participants to gain from the course.

COURSE STAFF

Abhijit Vinayak Banerjee

Abhijit Banerjee was educated at the University of Calcutta, Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Harvard University. He is currently the Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics at MIT. Banerjee is a past president of the Bureau for Research in the Economic Analysis of Development, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, and has been a Guggenheim Fellow and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow. He is the recipient of many awards, including the inaugural Infosys Prize in 2009, and has been an honorary advisor to many organizations including the World Bank and the government of India.

Esther Duflo

Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at MIT. She was educated at the Ecole Normale Supérieure, in Paris, and at MIT. She has received numerous honors and prizes including a John Bates Clark Medal for the best American economist under 40 in 2010, a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship in 2009. She was recognized as one of the best eight young economists by The Economist magazine, one of the 100 most influential thinkers by Foreign Policy since the list exists, and one of the “Forty under 40” most influential business leaders under forty by Fortune magazine in 2010.

Collaboration

Professors Banerjee and Duflo, together with Prof. Sendhil Mullainathan of Harvard University, founded theAbdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab in 2003. In 2011, their book, Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, won the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award.

FOR MORE CLASSES GO TO:

https://www.edx.org/?utm_source=Rubicon&utm_medium=banner&utm_campaign=Dec12_home_300x250

This is my I’m badass and learning shit face.IMG_1832